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Farewell from the News Editor

I can’t believe it’s finally time for farewells. After all these years, I still wonder, do I dare have the right?

 

I first joined the Oracle my freshman year, about two months before school let out for the summer. I remember being so nervous during my interview and the first meeting I attended. I told everyone that I was going to solve a mystery and be on the front page . . . Oh, how I cringe.

 

My first article was co-written with Cicely Rubottom and was about Oral Roberts. We interviewed faculty, researched and wrote what seemingly was my proudest piece, only to be told that it was getting cut. Summer started and I had yet to publish an article. 

 

Though dejected, I still attended meetings and was part of the team starting my sophomore year. One day, a story idea was handed to me. The rest became history. 

 

When I first joined the Oracle, it was only meant to be a hobby, yet for the next three years of undergrad, the Oracle has remained to be one of the best parts of college. 

 

Due to the coronavirus, our physical time at school has been cut and every trip, club or meeting that I looked forward to also came to a close. No one could’ve imagined this virus to have such a big impact on all of us and separate people as it did. And we still had two more print cycles to look forward to. Gosh darn you coronavirus!

 

Yet in the midst of this, sitting in my bed and wrapped in a blanket, I can only look back on these four years with a wistful heart. Truth to be told, I don’t really know what to write, though I do know I want it to be sentimental. Out of all the emotions a person can feel, for some reason, I like to feel sadness and cry when reading, so I hope to convey that same feeling when writing. Ha-ha.

 

ORU has taught me so much. The time spent here has been a constant place of inspiration and adventure, and it’s mostly due to the people at ORU. I’m so incredibly blessed to have worked with the best team. Thank you for helping and pushing me to be the best news editor and writer that I could be. Thank you especially to Zoe Rubottom and Staci McCoy for being the great leaders that you are. Work nights were worth it because of you two, and I know that I don’t even have the smallest grasp of how much work was put in even after those work nights. 

 

Thank you to all the professors that have influenced me in the best way possible. I never knew school could be so fun, so thank you for changing my perspective. I’ve still got a lot to learn and many areas to grow in, but I’m proud to say that I am not the same person I was four years ago. So thank you to all the people and friends that I’ve met along the way and for all the memories that I get to cherish now and forever.

 

I sure will miss being a student at ORU. I’ll miss the days of eating unique foods at saga, having spontaneous dance parties and just being plain dumb. Not that I can’t do any of these after graduation—it’ll just be different now.

 

My time working for the Oracle has been and will always be one of the best decisions I’ve probably made in my life. Graduating really is bittersweet, and I’m not entirely sure I’m ready to move on. But time has no master, and if I could somehow travel time to talk to my freshman self, it would be to tell her to cherish the moment.

 

So, to all my fans out there, I leave you with the famous words of Andy Bernard: “I wish there was a way to know you’re in the good old days before you actually left them.”